Zimbabwe Fails Its Young People

By Chief K.Masimba Biriwasha| AfroFutures.com Global Editor-At-Large| Harare

ZIMBABWE’s acrimonious political system marked by a bitter rivalry between ZANU PF and MDC political parties combined with a decade-long economic collapse has sidelined the social and economic rights of young people, according to a recently published study.

The new study, which surveyed 1500 urban-based youths  in Harare, Bulawayo, Gweru, Mutare and Chitungwiza, revealed that most young people, that is, 76 percent of the respondents had a basic understanding of their socio-economic rights. Most of the young people felt that promoting such rights through human rights education is required.

In addition, 58 percent of the youth respondents said the government has the primary responsibility for providing socio-economic rights

The study, which was conducted by Youth Initiative for Democracy in Zimbabwe (YIDEZ), aimed to investigate young people’s views on social and economic rights, focusing on awareness, availability and accessibility of such rights.

Many youths in Zimbabwe – approximately 65 percent of the total population – are currently trapped in poverty and unemployment, with their voices largely curtailed in nation building endeavours such as the constitution making process. The study, titled, “Socio-Economic Rights: Youths Know Your Rights,” revealed that the current constitution does not have a provision for economic and social rights of young people. This is despite the fact that over the years the government has ratified various international human rights instruments which it has failed to incorporate into domestic law. According to Sydney Chisi, director of YIDEZ, the ongoing constitution making process had been a missed opportunity to address the issue of young people’s economic and social rights.

“The motivation of the study was the context of socio-economic rights within the framework on the ongoing discussion on the constitution. One of the missing links is that the discussion has been largely political and there has been very little focus on issues of socio-economic rights. If you look at the political discourse in post independent Zimbabwe, you’ll see that we have been moving away from issues of social and economic rights,” said Sydney Chisi, director of  YIDEZ.

To reduce unemployment rates and increase access to jobs, most of the young people surveyed said that Zimbabwe needs major legislative and policy reforms and external assistance for economic development. Sixty-two percent felt that an effective land audit should be conducted by the government to repossess all unproductive land and redistribute it to productive farmers.

The survey found that 32 percent of young people felt that title deeds should be issued to farmers to ensure security of tenure and boost confidence in the farming sector, while 6 percent felt that government must mobilize and distribute farm inputs before the beginning of each season.

“It is all about bread and butter issues. It about access to health, education and responsible local governance. It is difficult to talk about politics and democracy without taking it consideration fundamental human rights. The absence of access to fundamental social and economic rights will exacerbate the abuse of young people. Politicians have a way to come and promise services to young people. So we want young people to know about their basic social and economic rights  as a way for them to demand accountability from their local and national governance structures without necessarily being partisan,” said Chisi.

In the study,  72 percent of the respondents, said that despite slight improvement in the provision of health care following the formation of the inclusive government, young people were still facing a plethora of challenges to access affordable and quality healthcare. In addition, the respondents felt that decrease in public financing of the education sector, exorbitant fees and shortage of teachers is hindering young people from accessing quality education.

According to the study, the sidelining of social and economic rights can be a powder keg that if left unaddressed can hinder the country’s development.

“Zimbabwe has become a nation that is marked by oppressive political arrangements that favour particular segments of society and marginalize the basic survival rights of the average masses. It is saddening to note that social and economic rights have taken second or no place at all in the country priorities,” says the study.